9 Great Fonts for Amazing Pinterest Graphics - Benjamin Schwalb

9 Great Fonts for Amazing Pinterest Graphics

Have you ever designed Pinterest images for your blog post, and struggled finding the right font?

If you've ever designed anything, you know that feeling.

There's a bajillion of fonts out there. But somehow, none of the ones you have ever feel right.

That's why I started collecting fonts in a neat Word file, so I could easily go through my favorite fonts in different categories.

Let me share some of them for you, specifically for pin design!

Bold Fonts

I like to use big, bold letters for some big headlines, for a big call-to-action, or sometimes to highlight something in particular. Don't overuse these fonts, though - the more text you use it for (in a single pin), the less effective.

A classic font that's highly popular, only available in all-caps and a little narrow, but a great and easily-readable font that I like to use for sub-headlines. You can download it here. Available for use in Canva by default.

Another one of my favorite super-heavy fonts for big, eye-catching headlines or a call-to-action. Not available on Canva by default, sadly, but you can download it here.

If you're looking for a serif font, this one might be just right for big, bold statements. (Note: serifs are those little things on characters, like the short horizontal lines at the bottom of most lines) Available in Canva and you can download it here.

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Script Fonts

I think those are the hardest to find, by far. Most are just not readable on a phone unless they are huge, which makes them worthless for pin design. Here are some options I like:

Dancing Script

My absolute favorite at the moment. I use this for my own pins almost exclusively for script fonts. Easy enough to read, playful, but not too over-the-top. Available in Canva or through Google fonts.

For a slightly heavier, playful choice, I like Amarillo. Sadly, not available in Canva (you can upload it, but only on a premium plan at the moment). You can download it here.

Allura

This one is available in Canva again, and another great, light choice. It's a little less playful and more on the elegant side, but a great font to use. You can also download it here.

Body Fonts

Sometimes, you just need to have some regular, plain old text on your pins. These fonts are great for bigger chunks of text, from a sentence to a full blog post - you can use these for anything!

Open Sans

A classic font that is simple and elegant, widely used, with a wide variety of types. (different thickness, cursive,...) I'm using it for this text, and I'll attach a sample paragraph, too.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Roboto

A little less round, but very subtle. Works great for slightly more tech-y looks, for serious or strong designs.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Raleway

The "w" of Raleway is it's unique feature that you'll recognize on sooo many websites and salespages once you know it. It works great for both light or medium thick body fonts, or even for headlines if you use it in bold or all-caps. A very modern, slightly "special" look.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

How to use them

Now that you've got all these amazing fonts... what do you do with them?

Create beautiful pins of course! Here's how:

You need to know how much text you'll have, first. For a short title (< 8 words), you can pick a bold font and write the title in big, bold letters. Make it softer by turning a part of the title into a script font.

Then, add some more text or a subtitle with either a lighter title font, an accent font, or your body font.

Tadaa, done!

Here are some examples (that you are very welcome to pin and save for later!):

Bebas Neue with Assistant as second font (didn't include it in the list, but it's one of the fonts I chose for my branding).

Assistant again, with Rockwell as accent font - also part of my branding. Mixing Sans-Serif (Assistant) with Serif (Rockwell) can also be done to mix things up a little.

Mont Heavy with Dancing Script - mixing bold fonts with playful script fonts keeps things from becoming too blocky.

Dancing Script with Assistant - mixing script with bold again, but this time in a single headline.

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